2018 Unofficial On-Campus Housing Guide: By Students, For Students

Welcome. When looking for housing options, the CC website left much to be desired. It gave a description of each house on campus but no clue as to what it was really like to live there. We hope this guide helps you figure that out, as well as clears up the process.

Important things to note before you begin:

  1. If you are planning on living in a double or a triple, you must have a roommate selected at the time of selection. If you do not, only singles will appear as options and you have a high chance of ending up on a waitlist or in a dorm you do not want to live in.
  2. You and your roommate must request one another using student ID numbers.
  3. If you apply for theme and apartment housing, you will hear back in time to enter the regular housing selection pool.
  4. Class standing no longer determines housing access. It is the number of semesters you have been on campus.
  5. If you are worried about the lottery selection, you can fill out a practice room-selection form. Rochelle Taylor will send out an email with the link in mid-April.
  6. At 8 a.m. on  May 11th, a waitlist opens up. You can stay on a waitlist even if you have picked a room. In the first part of August, people will start to hear back about getting off the waitlist. You will definitely hear about it by email before you return to school.
  7. If you miss every deadline, every person at CC is guaranteed housing. You will be randomly assigned where there is space.

To search the guide, press Command (⌘) f [macs] or Control (ctrl) f [pc] and search for the housing option you want to learn about:

The Big 3: Slocum, Mathias, Loomis  ;  Language houses: French, Asian, Italian, German, Russian, Spanish  ;  Small Houses: The Inn, Bemis, Jackson, McGregor, Montgomery, Ticknor  ;  Apartments: Western Ridge (Blanca, El Diente, LJK, Antero), Edith Gaylord, East Campus Apts, East Campus Houses  ;  Theme Housing: Synergy, Glass House, Arthur, Fiji, SigChi, K-Sig

Some ideas for adjectives to search:  Big/Small (will find the dorms with big rooms)  ;  Community (will tell you which dorms have strong or weak communities)  ;  Quiet/Loud (will tell you which dorms are loud or quiet)


FOR PEOPLE ON FIN-AID: While the official byline is that anyone can live anywhere, this is misleading.

This is the cost breakdown:

Financial Aid Breakdown 2018-19 School Year

What this means: Your aid does not go up to cover the increased housing cost. You will have to pay the full price of the housing you wish to live in, after which the school will refund you the difference between the apartment meal-plan and meal-plan C in the form of a cash refund or a loan-reduction. Many people put this difference towards paying off the room. If you plan to do so, be aware that the apartment meal-plan is $380 a year, so you will still have to cover meals on your own. If you have any questions about your specific plan, reach out to reach out to Financial Aid at financialaid@coloradocollege.edu.


Loomis Hall
South Hall
Mathias Hall

The Big 3: Most people on campus know about the big three. These dorms are required freshman housing, but each has its own flavor and personality. Though predominantly first-years, these buildings are home to people in a wide range of grades. Anyone looking for a dorm environment is welcome.

Application Process (non-LLC): Students will receive a time-slot over email on April 4th. Times will be distributed by semester on campus. People with 6+ semesters–mostly seniors– will select housing on Friday, May 4th. People with 4-5 semesters–mostly juniors– will select on Monday, May 7th and Tuesday, May 8th. People with 2-3 semesters–mostly sophomores– will select on Wednesday, May 9th and Thursday, May 10th.

South Hall (previously Slocum): Cody Leong

Best for someone who… Wants a nice room.

Pros:

  • Rooms are really big.
  • Halls are pretty quiet.
  • All the facilities are nice.
  • Conveniently located.

Cons:

  • The community isn’t as close here as it is in the other dorms.

People think that… SH has no culture, is isolated from the rest of campus, and that everyone goes to other dorms to party.

But really… SH is not really not that. It has a real personality of its own. Everyone is super chill and minds their own business.

Something people should know about living in South Hall: As upperclassmen, if you have other friends living here, it’s better.

Mathias: Spencer Levy

Best for someone who... Wants to get to know people in their first year.

Pros:

  • The c-store.
  • The RAs are awesome.
  • It’s the proper distance from everything—centrally located.
  • Lots of things going on.
  • See friends everywhere.
  • 4th floor has super high ceilings.

Cons:

  • It can be loud.
  • Sometimes the bathrooms are really gross.
  • No kitchen in some of the halls.

People think that...it’s a good time. The perception is that there are always things going on during all the going out days. It’s not a quiet dorm.

But really... that is pretty much true! It’s good. If you need to borrow something, there is always someone to lend it to you. Common areas are always busy. Friends are everywhere. It’s a happy place.

Something you would like people to know about living in Mathias: It’s social—not to a fault—but very. If you’re not that kind of person, it might not be great for you. It isn’t quiet.

Loomis: Rebekah Latham and Emily Main

Best for someone who: Wants a close hall community and is a heavy sleeper.

Pros:

  • Location is the biggest one.
  • The exposed brick is nice.
  • Although there are many freshmen, the grade levels are very mixed.
  • Ads in the stairways are changed frequently to keep up with events on campus.
  • There is always something going on in Loomis lounge.

Cons:

  • Sometimes the heater doesn’t work.
  • Quiet hours aren’t really obeyed, particularly on the weekends. It’s older.

People think that... It’s really close-knit but also kind of gross sometimes, but all-around good.

But really... It’s very friendly and homier than Slocum.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Loomis”: Take advantage of the location and get to know the people you live around.


LLC’s: Living Learning Communities are themed wings in each of the Big Three. Some, like 24-hour quiet, cater to people’s interests or personality. Others, like Revitalizing nations, explore and protect identity. All create strongly-bonded communities of people gathered to respect and love one another.

Application Process: People apply to LLC’s in a low-key process. Online applications will be available online on March 13th and are due by April 13th. Students will hear back on April 25th and have until the 26th to accept or deny their acceptance. 

Pride Hall (SH): Halle Schall and Asa Hussain

Pride hall provides a space where students who identify as LGBTQ+ or wish to learn about issues impacting LGBTQ+ identities can live, interact, and engage in dialog.

“Also it’s gay” -Halle Schall

Best for someone who: is hoping to meet and spend time with other queer students and do fun things together in a tight-knit community. It is also a great space to comfortably question and express queer identities.

Pros:

  • Being around queer people who get non-typical pronouns, won’t judge you for what you are wearing, and are open to being around people who are gender fluid.
  • It is nice to be around freshmen who are still enamored with being on campus.
  • The RA legitimately gives a shit and will take no shit about people disrespecting the space.
  • A strong community in which people look out for one another and make each other food.
  • A queer RLC and a queer RA, which makes for an atmosphere of support and openness.

Cons:

  • Not truly a ‘safe space,’ as there is no way to turn away people who don’t identify as queer.
  • People don’t know about it.
  • The kitchen is gross.

People think that…  Everyone in Pride Hall are hyper-gays, people for whom sexuality is the defining feature of their identity.

But really…  No one is that! A lot of people realize it as a part of their life, but it’s not the only part. There is no gay agenda, and it’s a really great safe space where different genders and sexualities are just a normal part of life. Everyone here loves, admires, and cares about one another. The community is incredibly tight-knit, and the connections between the residents are really strong. People are often out in the kitchen cooking or hanging out in the bump-out. You see people baking and cooking and having a good time every day.

Something people should know about Pride Hall: Even if you don’t live here and identify as queer, come hang out!

Revitalizing Nations (SH): Brandon Edwards and Judy Fisher

This community is a place where Native American students can express their own religious and social identities in a way that is comfortable to them. It is geared towards developing a sense of community for Indigenous students and their allies through a recognition of the similarities between the many tribes represented at the school.

Best for someone who: Is looking for a safe space where they can be around other native students.

Pros:

  • Creates the opportunity to do cultural events
  • Helps mobilize the culture
  • Nice to have everyone in one place

Cons:

  • It creates a place that could be targeted
  • It’s hard to create a safe space in a white building

People think that... it’s hyper-cultural. They also think only native people live here.

But really… It’s pretty mixed, though that isn’t really a good thing. It does intersect a lot with the Native American student union and the Pride LLC since the bump-out is shared.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Revitalizing Nations”: It’s different every year depending on the RA or other students. There is a lot of potential to make friends and find community here.

Sub-free (Slocum): Max Sarkowsky

Best for someone who… Wants a nice place to live and a lower-key hall that isn’t going to be noisy or smell like weed on a Saturday night.

Pros:

  • The hall is close to and utilizes the bump-out and kitchen.
  • Hall events are really nice.
  • Clean and quiet.

Cons:

  • The hall isn’t completely sub-free
  • Slocum is less lit than other places.

People think that… the hall is really sub-free.

But really… It’s just quieter and cleaner than other halls, particularly in the bathrooms. Being in sub-free doesn’t mean you can’t go out, and many of the people in the hall are not sub-free themselves. Because of this, there isn’t that big of a community, definitely the least of the LLCs.

Something you would like people to know about living in sub-free Slocum: It isn’t crazy strict about sub-freeness. There aren’t constant room checks at all.

All Women (Loomis): Taylor Hawkins and Brett Wilsey

Best for someone who... Wants to live in a hall full of girls.

Pros:

  • The hall is quieter than a normal hall.
  • We don’t get drunk people roaming through.
  • Everyone is super nice.
  • It’s a really comfortable place for girls to live.
  • Laundry is about two steps away.
  • There is a full kitchen on the floor.
  • The bathroom is really clean.

Cons:

  • People can see in through the windows
  • Once the hall flooded

People think that... the girls who live in the hall are shut-ins. People think they don’t have lives, or go out, or have friends. They think we will yell at boys if they are in the hall.

But really... it’s just a normal hall with all girls. We are closer because we are the only hall like ours. It’s a really comfortable environment

Something you would like people to know about living in “all-women housing”: The hall is what you make it. Talk to the people around you. If you didn’t choose to live here, you will come to like it. A lot of people end up there not by choice, but if you are friendly it can be a really nice community.

Enclave (Mathias): Trevon Newmann

This community serves as a social and cultural enclave, or safe space, for people of color at Colorado College. It is a space to get to know more about yourself, your affiliations, your campus, and the surrounding community of Colorado Springs. Also serves as a medium for cultural exchange.

Best for someone who... is open and looking for a strong community of POC.

Pros:

  • You get to meet a lot of different students.
  • Close to the programs set up to bring people together.
  • Hall dinners every month.
  • There is typically food.
  • You get to create the space.
  • You have your own kitchen and TV. We are the only dorm with cable.
  • Usually quiet and pretty chill.

Cons:

  • Small hall, so there is only one place to do work.
  • If you are looking for places to be out on your own, this isn’t the place. Everyone does homework, cooks, and watches TV in the living room.
  • Not many singles.
  • People get lost coming in.
  • The kitchen is open to the whole hall, so you have to watch your stuff.

People think that... Mathias is a wild and crazy party dorm.

But really... This hall is quite the opposite. The enclave is a space for students of color and bridge students, predominantly freshman. It’s a pretty wholesome place. In the enclave you see one another all the time.

Something you would like people to know about living in the Enclave”: It’s really what you make it. There are so many different people here from so many different backgrounds. This place is what the community is. We are studious, but it’s also a place to confide, relax, and play. The Enclave is a place people feel they can relax and just be. People are always sleeping on the couch; no one wants to leave!

OELLC (Mathias): Jubilee Hernandez

This community is committed to enhancing the knowledge, skills and leadership development of students through outdoor and community service experiences. It’s can also be a place to developing skills in leadership and program and trip development.

Best for someone who… wants to engage in the outdoors and doesn’t necessarily have connections or the funds to do so on their own.

Pros:

  • All of the programs are amazing. Every block there are 4 events: hiking day trip, ski trip to Breck, trampoline world, movie nights, cabin trip, making art about what the outdoors means to you. Each year it changes. The programs that are put on are what residents are interested in.
  • Being around like-minded individuals.
  • It’s a localized community.
  • A strong group of really outdoorsy people.
  • Introduction into the OEC.

Cons:

  • Because people really do enjoy the outdoors, people aren’t always around. You have a good relationship with the couple of people you hang out with in the hall.
  • If you enjoy quiet areas, this isn’t the hall for you. Residents are rowdy, loud, and love to hang out.

People think that...It’s white and filthy. Everyone is very into the outdoors, very active, always wanting to climb or ski or just be outdoors. Really a mess, very disgusting. There is a conception that if you’re an outdoors person, you can’t be neat.

But really… while not diverse, it is a space that is really open to cultivating an inclusive community to help break stereotypes that the outdoors are only for the white and wealthy. We have a budget for our programs, so it’s a great place to learn things like skiing and climbing. It definitely is a group of people who are super outdoorsy, but there is a wide range of interests in addition to the outdoors. There are a lot of people who enjoy art and are in clubs and doing other things generally. There are some issues of cleanliness, but not from the residents of the hall. We really value being clean.

Something you would like people to know about living in OLEC: The hall is what you make of it. If you come in and really want to be in community with, teach, and learn from other individuals, you have to be intentional about cultivating that kind of community. There has to be mutual agreement from everyone. You have to do your part.


Theme Housing: Predominantly small houses, theme housing is great for people who are looking for close-knit intentional communities. They cater to a variety of interests, identities, and personalities across campus. Theme houses are a great way to get off-campus as an underclassman while retaining structure.

Application Process: People apply to specific houses in a low-key process. Online applications will be available online on March 13th and are due by April 13th. Students will hear back on April 25th and have until the 26th to accept or deny their acceptance.

Synergy: Monica Black

Synergy is a dedicated and intentional group of Colorado College students united in the pursuit of sustainable living. We recognize and value how sustainability has different meanings for different people and commit to share, develop, and explore those understandings of sustainability together. Synergy is a welcoming and open space for all of the CC community to gather and support one another in the search for equitable and innovative solutions to economic, social, and environmental issues.

Best for someone who... is willing to learn. You will learn a lot from the people around you about gardening, growing food, and energy consumption as well as systemic contributors to ecological destruction.

Pros:

  • Beautiful houses
  • Really good food
  • Equitable housing option for sophomores and juniors because it is not on the meal plan
  • You learn how to live in a community of people. All the goods and bads that come with living with people

Cons:

  • It’s a real commitment (this is also a pro though!)

People think that... It’s all crunchy granola eaters who like to garden in overalls.

But really... It’s super eclectic! People live here for all different kinds of reasons. The main thing is the super tight community. We cook, eat, and grow food together. People here are thinking about how to live more sustainably and are involved in sustainability, economic, or justice organizations. There are also a lot of cool projects with lots of access to funding you are expected to get involved in.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Synergy”: Know what you are getting into. We don’t want to exclude but this place is really cool when people work really hard on their projects. There is a lot of room to do projects. There is a lot of potential to make your ideas a reality. It is an experimental space that you can bring your experiences to.

Glass House: Ryan Garcia

This is a social justice-themed community by and for people of color dedicated to providing a safe environment where dialogues regarding race, inclusion, ethnicity, equity, backgrounds, and belief systems are encouraged and supported.

Best for someone who: wants to get away from the PWI’ness of CC but still be on CC’s campus. Marginalized students on campus always look for some kind of outlet. This is my outlet because it's very diverse.

Pros:

  • Big rooms.
  • Community.
  • Not a lot of people here.

Cons:

  • There’s not as much of a community as in the Big 3.
  • It’s far from some buildings on campus.
  • The walk to campus eateries is long.

People think that… it’s a lot of just people of color. The ‘multi-cultural’ place. People see it as exclusionary. They also think it’s like a family.

But really... though we hardly ever see each other this year, we really take care of each other. You can create any community you want.

Something you would like people to know about living in “The Glass House”: This is the safe haven for those who are marginalized. If you’re interested definitely apply. The living room is open to anyone on campus who wants a safe space, so feel free to stop by.

Arthur: Madeline Wilson

This community is substance-free and quiet.

Best for someone who: likes to have their own cozy space that can’t be invaded by other people and is impermeable to the ruckus of campus.

Pros:

  • Small community.
  • Right next to the science buildings (good for science majors)
  • Near the C-Store.
  • Really good study space and amenities
  • The rooms are generally bigger. There are a couple small singles upstairs but most are large.
  • Big windows in the rooms.

Cons:

  • The entire building is crooked–sometimes the drawers just open up.
  • The heaters are finicky. It takes some time to temperature regulate.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Arthur”: You can’t smoke weed in the house. At all. It is substance-free for a reason.


Language Houses - The language houses provide a cultural and academic focus on International Language and its associated cultural experiences. Residents maintain a commitment to learning about the cultures of the regions where the language is spoken. While knowing or taking the language isn’t required, be ready to participate in hall events and engage with other hall residents.

French House: Olivia Noonan

Best for someone who: wants a small community of people with shared interests, in this case, French language and culture.

Pros:

  • You can live outside of the freshman dorms as a Sophomore.
  • Really nice kitchen and living area with a TV.
  • The rooms are pretty big and beautiful for the most part. Some have great views of Pikes.
  • You can request a roommate or a single.

Cons:

  • Location. It is far from the science buildings and Armstrong. Close to the gym and the preserve.
  • Just off a Uintah, which means you can often hear the cars.
  • It’s an old building. For a couple weeks the shower didn’t work.
  • You only get swipe access to your own house in the language houses.
  • There are people who get placed even though they have no connection to the theme.

People think that... it has a strong community with lots of hall events and a lot of French practice.

But really... you don’t have to speak French to be in the house and the community hasn’t been too strong for the past two years.

Something you would like people to know about living in the French House: You get to skip the worst part of the housing process for a nice room in a small house. It particularly benefits people with a bad time slot.

Italian House: Julian Moulton

Best for someone who: wants to feel like they aren’t living in as dormy of a situation and likes Italian food.

Pros:

  • Nice singles.
  • Great Italian food.
  • Close enough to things, but nicely out of the way.
  • It’s just cool, particularly if a lot of friends apply to live here.
  • RAs are lax (this year).  

Cons:

  • The drier breaks down a lot.
  • No printers.
  • Long walks to get to classes.
  • No gold-card access to the other language houses.

People think that… It’s weird, a little separated from campus, and requires Italian language learning. They also think the rules are strictly enforced.  

But really... the RA and the CPC do a lot to generate a community, so people are pretty close. You meet a lot of cool people through the events and there are fun pre-games. Sometimes the German house hosts cool parties. You don’t have to speak the language.

Something you would like people to know about living in the Italian House: As long as you are interested in learning about Italian culture and be open to going to events you will have a great time here.

Asian House: Abbie Wang

Best for someone who: is interested in Asian culture and wants a quiet community.

Pros:

  • Blockly events provide a lot of really good food—the best thing.
  • Really quiet.
  • Really good community.
  • The views are really great.

Cons:

  • It’s a little far away from the main buildings compared to other houses.
  • Only one washing machine, so sometimes we use the ones in Gaylord.

People think that... People in the Asian house speak only Japanese.

But really… There are a lot of students who are randomly assigned, as well as language learners and people interested in all Asian cultures generally. You get to share cultures and differences by celebrating events together. It’s a great community.

Something you would like people to know about living in the Asian House: Start learning about the house and Asian culture through the Japanese adjunct!

German House: Oliver Jones and Joe Vuchetich

Best for someone who: wants a strong community and a beautiful house–the best house.

Pros:

  • Excellent kitchen and living space.
  • ‘Best rooms on campus.’
  • Great social gathering places, particularly the carriage house and the garden.
  • Best chair to do homework ever.
  • Great views from some of the rooms.
  • Koi pond with four, dear koi.
  • Kaffee Klatsch events every week
  • Great location.
  • Great relationships with the other language houses.  

Cons:

  • There are some plumbing issues but literally nothing else.

People think that… Most people don’t know about it. The people who do know about it love it.

But really… the community here is very, very strong, more than any other house on campus both this year and last year. A big part of it is through the social spaces. Lots of international students also contribute to this. There are lots of communal meals, parties, and cooking. Kaffee Klatsch is once a week and a big part of dorm culture. The house opens up to the whole campus for coffee, baked goods, and a chat about something German-related. Students who live in the hall give presentations or just hang out. You have to have some German-related reason to be here. You don’t have to speak the language or have a friend involved in the German department. You just have to show that you want to be here and contribute

Something you would like people to know about living in the “German house”: Come to Klatsch and be involved with the apartments and events. The CPC will choose people he knows because they have gone. Be involved.

Spanish House: Melissa Taing

Best for someone who: is open-minded. There are many different types of Spanish and Portuguese speakers here.

Pros:

  • A really nice community space.
  • A really amazing CPC.
  • The rooms are nice.
  • There is a peaceful vibe most of the time.
  • It gets fun, too!
  • No one ever feels excluded in the space.

Cons:

  • Walls are not the thickest.
  • Some people don’t clean up after themselves.
  • Some find the location challenging.

People think that… everyone speaks Spanish and likes to dance.

But really… it’s super chill. It’s a really relaxed environment. No one feels obligated to be here. It can be hard to speak Spanish with others because everyone is at different levels, but the cultural days and coffee meetings are awesome. Dorm events are a great time.

Something you would like people to know about living in the Spanish house: The community is what you make it. Be involved in the events and try to practice Spanish.

Russian House: Shane Brown

Best for someone who: Likes peace and quiet and free laundry.

Pros:

  • Strong Community.
  • Free laundry.
  • Immersion in Russian culture.

Cons:

  • The house is really old, so lots of maintenance issues.
  • The walls are very thin.

People think that… the people here are nerds. The house is very quiet and not much goes on.

But really... it’s a very chill community; everyone is there for each other. All the people in the house are close. There is a brunch celebration of birthdays every month that everyone goes to. There is also Russian tea every week. Almost half of the house doesn’t speak Russian, so it’s really not a prerequisite.

Something you would like people to know about living in the “Russian House”: The people are very nice, and the CPC is amazing. I recommend it to anyone who is a quiet person looking for community and doesn’t intend on having parties.

Fraternities– Fraternities are on campus companionships and brotherhoods dedicated to the intellectual, academic, physical or social pursuits of its members. Our campus has three frats, and some great people live in each of them. Each has its own flavor but all are a good time.

Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI): John-Henry Williams and Ty Christensen

Phi Gamma Delta unites men in enduring friendships, stimulates the pursuit of knowledge, and builds courageous leaders who serve the world with the best that is in them.

Best for someone who: Is in Fiji. Someone who is very sociable and adventurous.

Pros:

  • The people are awesome. The social setting is amazing.
  • We have an amazing speaker system we casually bump. Lots of dancing around the house.
  • Nice TV.
  • Lots of autonomy. We don’t have an RA we have to check in with so there is a lot of freedom to do what we want.
  • Get a lot of trust from the administration for being campus leaders.
  • Lots of storage space
  • Organization perks and parties.
  • You are in the middle of everything. You can take a leading role in the organization.

Cons:

  • Size. This is the smallest frat house regardless of membership.
  • The house is pretty old. It’s really hard for the school to renovate. Holes in the walls and other things take a while to get fixed.
  • It’s hard sharing a space with an organization. There it a thin line between common space and organization space.

People think that… it’s going to be all super jockey white dudes who don’t go to class and party all the time. People think it’s a pigsty with the ‘party mess’ there till the next week.

But really… everyone here breaks that stereotype. This year there are no white guys in the house and it is the cleanest fraternity– Sodexo cleans all the frats on sunday and likes Fiji the most. It is also a really strong community. There is no fighting and not a lot of conflict. The whole frat has swipe access so a lot of the younger guys come through. It’s a mentoring community type thing. Very communal living. We all share groceries and laundry money. Unless it’s in our personal rooms everything is up for grabs.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Fiji”: You get really close with the people you live with. They will be your best friends. Although you might feel helpless about having others enter your space consistently, you can make this frat house a home.

Sigma Chi (Sig-Chi): Mitchell Ukropina

The fundamental purpose of the Sigma Chi Fraternity is the cultivation, maintenance, and promotion of the core values of Friendship, Justice, and Learning.

Best for someone who: is a social person who wants a tight group of friends, likes the essence of community, stays up pretty late, and parties. It’s not a great place for people who like their own space and being solitary.

Pros:

  • Really easy to go out.
  • You can get a single and a really cool social scene for yourself as a sophomore.
  • It’s a safer way to party.
  • There aren’t RAs.
  • Great community.

Cons:

  • It’s really hard to not go out or go to bed early. If you have a big test or something sometimes you have to stay with a friend.

People think that... it’s probably pretty gross and pretty nasty.

But really… it’s like living in an apartment, so it kind of is, but Sodexo cleans on Sundays. Love all the guys in the house. You get to have five of your friends around all the time.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Sigma Chi”: The sense of community is awesome. It’s the same thing as living in a theme house or a dorm. It’s a leg up on sophomore housing. Being in the frat is my favorite thing on campus.

Kappa Sigma (K-Sig): Jack Martin

Kappa Sigma is focused upon the Four Pillars of Fellowship, Leadership, Scholarship, and Service.

Best for someone who: Drinks heavily but also just enjoys the presence of brothers cooking, doing laundry, or hanging out. It’s a very communal space.

Pros:

  • Community.
  • Laundry machines don’t require quarters.
  • Not much campus supervision.
  • Professional cleaning downstairs.

Cons:

  • You wake up on a Saturday morning to a destroyed first floor and a sticky beer atmosphere downstairs. It’s gone by the end of the day though.

People think that... It’s disgusting to live here.

But really... It’s great living here with people I really get along with. It’s really nice to be here living with brothers. A lot of people hang out in the house. You don’t have to go out of your way to see people.

Something you would like people to know about living in “K-Sig”: You’re given a lot of freedom and privilege living here. It’s really important to stay serious about school and stay focused on the things that are really important. It can be a lot of fun to live here but there can be too much of a good thing.


Small Houses: Ranging from 25 to 76 people, not all small houses are small. Many are old mansions which have been converted into residence halls. The cozy, warm atmosphere is an attractive feature, making these buildings among the most desirable living accommodations on campus.They are close to the action on campus while allowing a more independent feel for upper-class students.

Application Process: Students will receive a time-slot over email on April 4th. Times will be distributed by semester on campus. People with 6+ semesters–mostly seniors– will select housing on Friday, May 4th. People with 4-5 semesters–mostly juniors– will select on Monday, May 7th and Tuesday, May 8th. People with 2-3 semesters–mostly sophomores– will select on Wednesday, May 9th and Thursday, May 10th.

Bemis: Sonja Volker

Best for someone who: Is pretty independent but still on the meal plan. Also good if you want a single (generally).

Pros:

  • Really close to the Preserve.
  • Lots of other housing options nearby so you are close to friends.

Cons:

  • Usually smells.
  • No kitchen
  • There isn’t a community.
  • It’s haunted.

People think that… It’s haunted.

But really... it is haunted. No one goes to hall events and people rarely talk to anyone in their hall. It’s very independent. It’s quiet this year, but last year there was a frat downstairs, so it varies.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Bemis”: If you want to live here, it’s not guaranteed you will get a single, but it’s very likely.

CC Inn: Claire Tobin

Best for someone who: likes their space.

Pros:

  • You can fit 45 people in the triples.The rooms are big.  
  • Bathrooms in every room.
  • Only 2 RAs for the entire Inn who are pretty chill and understanding.
  • Close to 7-11.

Cons:

  • You have to buy your own toilet paper.
  • The floors are pretty squeaky.
  • The building can get grimy if you can’t keep up with cleaning.

People think that… it’s kind of off the books. If you live here, no one is going to bother you. People don’t mind if you stomp around a bit.

But really... it’s pretty consistent with that. The rules are pretty lax. There are two RAss for a lot of people who don’t want them involved. A lot of sports people live here and you tend to be friends with the people living around you. There has been a soccer game in the hall at 9 p.m.

Something you would like people to know about living in “the Inn”: A lot of your friends will probably choose to live on the west side of campus. When you live in the inn you are a bit further away.

Jackson: Emily Ng

Best for someone who: is looking for a little bit of a commune culture. Nice safe-haven for the introvert and creative.

Pros:

  • Hardwood floors.
  • Beautiful building
  • Some of the rooms have great windows.
  • Really close to east campus and parties.

Cons:

  • The bathrooms get really nasty.
  • They building is really old, so hard to maintain.
  • Smaller community than something like Mathias.
  • Active choice to see the people you want to see.

People think that… It’s a really interesting mix of fratty and artsy.

But really... everyone kind of does their own thing. This year a lot of people know each other so there is an open door-policy. The entire 3rd floor was a party. People are close-knit.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Jackson”: Command strips will not work on the walls. Don’t try to take the windows out, you don’t have balcony access.

McGregor: Sarah Katsev

Best for someone who: likes to have their own space.

Pros:

  • All the rooms have a nice view, although the windows aren’t too big.
  • It’s quiet.
  • No waiting for showers and nice bathrooms.
  • Pretty cozy.
  • Not a confusing building.
  • The walls are pretty thick.

Cons:

  • Sometimes too quiet.
  • Rooms are pretty small.
  • Only one kitchen, and it’s pretty small.
  • The RA (this year) is pretty strict. Most people in the hall have gotten busted.
  • Quiet hours are the real deal.
  • If you live facing the field, you hear the practice and loud music.
  • If there is a weird smell in the building, everyone can smell it.

People think that… it’s pretty quiet and not really a place to come party. Fair number of juniors and seniors.

But actually... that’s pretty true. People here are more studious. We definitely have friends, but it feels like 24-hour quiet. It’s not super together, so people mostly keep to themselves but respect one another. The RA doesn’t plan events, but people wouldn’t go anyway.

Something you would like people to know about living in “McGregor”: Make the basement a common space and enjoy it! It’s a cool space that people don’t utilize enough.

Montgomery (All Women):  Gwen Wolfenbarger

Best for someone who: is not male and enjoys privacy.

Pros:

  • The privacy.
  • Respect people have for one another.
  • Positive atmosphere.
  • Quiet.
  • Comforting smell and feel to the building.

Cons:

  • Old facilities that frequently break down.

People think that… It’s very quiet, very respectful, and communal.

But really… It’s hard to actually have a community because it’s hard to gather people together. It’s all singles, so most people are just minding their own business.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Montgomery”: The walls are kind of thin, so be careful!

Ticknor: Hailey Dennis

Best for someone who: Wants to be close to most things on campus. Wants to live in a small house with upperclassmen in a low key laid back environment. It’s good for Sophomores and Juniors transitioning out of the big three.

Pros:

  • Convenience
  • Really low key and pretty quiet all the time
  • People don’t party here- just not a thing.
  • Building is really cute.
  • Nice study areas.

Cons:

  • Not a super tight-knit community.
  • People in the building are generally pretty independent.
  • Not like big 3 community.

People think that... it’s just super convenient.

But really... Residents do their own thing. Programs revolve around that, kind of seeking people outside or sitting outside. Everyone has their friend-groups already. If you’re looking for a super strong bonded friends with everyone else in the community it’s not here.This building is amazing though. It’s so good for sophomores and juniors who still want CC connection and meal plan but don’t want to live in an apt or the big three. Like all the small houses it’s a really good middle-ground.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Tickor”: Each room really varies in size and shape. Check out the floorplans if you are picky.


Apartments: The apartments are upperclassmen only. Good luck getting one of these setups before Junior year. With added independence and a discounted meal-plan, these apartments let you live on campus with almost complete independence and convenience.

Application Process for Edith Gaylord, 2-person, or studio apartments (online): Complete the apartment application either online or by picking it up in Bemis 139 by March 30th at 5:00 p.m. Each application will ask for a group leader who will act as the contact person for that group. If one of you has significant conduct history or multiple incidents together, the whole group will be ineligible. If you are uncertain whether or not your group qualifies to apply for an apartment together, we suggest that you email Xavier Karjohn regarding Western Ridge at xkarjohn@coloradocollege.edu or email Matt Edwards regarding East Campus at medwards@coloradocollege.edu prior to the March 30 deadline. Students will be sent selection time-slots via email on April 4th for selection on April 6th. Select here: https://hmsstudent.coloradocollege.edu/

Application Process for Western Ridge 6 person: Complete the apartment application either online or by picking it up in Bemis 139 by March 30th at 5:00 p.m. Each application will ask for a group leader who will act as the contact person for that group. If one of you has significant conduct history or multiple incidents together, the whole group will be ineligible. If you are uncertain whether or not your group qualifies to apply for an apartment together, we suggest that you email Xavier Karjohn regarding Western Ridge at xkarjohn@coloradocollege.edu or email Matt Edwards regarding East Campus at medwards@coloradocollege.edu prior to the March 30 deadline. The group with the lowest lottery number will be notified via email and will have until 4pm to accept the apartment offer. Once the apartment is accepted all other applicant groups will be notified of its unavailability.

Application Process for Western Ridge 4 or 5 person:

Students will receive a time-slot over email on April 4th. Students must complete the Apartment Application for their desired configuration. Each application will ask for a group leader who will act as the contact person for that group. If one of you has significant conduct history or multiple incidents together, the whole group will be ineligible. If you are uncertain whether or not your group qualifies to apply for an apartment together, we suggest that you email Xavier Karjohn regarding Western Ridge at xkarjohn@coloradocollege.edu or email Matt Edwards regarding East Campus at medwards@coloradocollege.edu prior to the March 30 deadline. Apartments will be selected in-person at Loomis Lounge on April 9th, 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Application Process for East Campus 8-person:

Students will receive a time-slot over email on April 4th. Students must complete the Apartment Application for their desired configuration. Each application will ask for a group leader who will act as the contact person for that group. If one of you has significant conduct history or multiple incidents together, the whole group will be ineligible. If you are uncertain whether or not your group qualifies to apply for an apartment together, we suggest that you email Xavier Karjohn regarding Western Ridge at xkarjohn@coloradocollege.edu or email Matt Edwards regarding East Campus at medwards@coloradocollege.edu prior to the March 30 deadline. Apartments will be selected in-person at Loomis Lounge on April 10th, 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Western Ridge Apts: Blanca, El Diente, LJK, Antero: Carly Cribbs and Bridget O’Neill

Best for someone who: Wants a place to live on campus that is still autonomous.

Pros:

  • Location is really nice.
  • Great view.
  • Close to the preserve.
  • Kitchens are really nice
  • There is a lot of space per-person. You only have to share with 4 people in the same size as east campus.
  • Most of the people living here are juniors.
  • It’s good for a travel-abroad living.
  • There is lots of storage space.

Cons:

  • It’s expensive.
  • Missing some appliances (no microwave).
  • It’s more minimal, you have to buy some things to make it homey.

People think that… everyone chooses to live here because of location

But really... It’s a good transition between living on campus and being off-campus. The RA’s are pretty laid back and you can be on the apartment meal plan.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Western Ridge Apartments”: It’s a good way to live in a single and meet new people, especially with going abroad.

Edith Gaylord: Ines Siepmann and Story Schwantes

Best for someone who: wants a cozy mostly quiet and centrally located living space that is a little more connected to itself- separated from the other apartments. Your community becomes the people you are in the apartments.

Pros:

  • Cozy.
  • Cute little garden.
  • Accessible parking lot.
  • Own laundry.
  • Close to the gym and Worner while also being the closest to the library of the apartments.
  • Great tiger-trail access and near the career center.
  • A lot of windows with great views.

Cons:

  • The only things are apartment specific maintenance things that are quickly fixed. There is a broken light.
  • No dining room table in the 6-person.
  • Slight separation from Western Ridge appartments.

People think that... it’s quiet.

But really... there is a huge community within the living group. You make your own food communally. You are living together, not just hanging out together. The apartments are mostly juniors, so it’s the first time you are living with a bigger group of friends. There is a darling RA, but people don’t show up to events unless there is free food involved.

Something you would like people to know about living in “Gaylord”: 10/10 would recommend. It’s a really good balance of being more independent than the dorms while still being very accessible to the campus community. Why would you be on the fence?! It’s amazing

East Campus Apartments: Summer Sellers

Best for someone who: Parties. The location is amazing for that. You don’t have to walk across campus to get home if you aren’t sober. It’s really convenient.

Pros:

  • Party proximity
  • Independent, feels pretty off campus. The school isn’t peering over your shoulders in the apartments.
  • No quiet hours.
  • One step down from living off campus.
  • Amazing porches connect the houses.

Cons:

  • No garbage disposal
  • Small rooms
  • The color of the whole apt is flat (white). Not very cozy. Couches aren’t comfortable.
  • 8 people, one dishwasher
  • Not enough storage space.
  • Command strips don’t really stick, tacks are the only way to go.

People think that... It’s an amalgam of upperclassmen with lots of sports teams.

But really... Within the apartment itself you have your own space, but you also get a community within your building. There isn’t too much connection between apartments unless you already know someone.

Something you would like people to know about living in “East Campus Apartments”: Diversify your roommates. Make sure you have a good mix of people who party and don’t, mix men and women, make sure you are comfortable with at least 2 roommates. Minimize storage space. Close your windows downstairs if you plan on doing anything. Invest in things that can make the apartment homier.

East Campus Small Houses: Sara Fleming

Best for someone who: wants their own space, wants to be a little more removed then somewhere like McGregor and doesn’t want to hang out in the dorm a lot.

Pros:

  • The buildings are super nice, and all the amenities are super functional.
  • You are a bit more removed from campus.
  • The decks are really nice.
  • The rooms have lights that dim.
  • A little quieter than places like Jackson but still near parties.
  • Mostly upperclassmen, which is really nice since most of the small houses are mixed.
  • Everyone is really independent.
  • Most of the rooms are singles.

Cons:

  • The walls are super thin.
  • The apartments don’t feel lived in, a bit too sanitized.
  • The crosswalk is terrible- you have to stop at the stoplight every time.
  • There isn’t any ‘natural’ community in the building.
  • Everything is pretty regulated.
  • You have to have your gold-card to be on the deck and there are times when you can’t be on it.
  • Each house has an RA. Not as strongly enforced compared to big 3 housing, but definitely a presence.  

People think that...  it’s the exclusive fancy apartment complex that is like a gated community.

But really... The small houses don’t have too much community, but people who don’t know each other are living together so you definitely make friends. It’s nice to be around the apartments, as they have better community.

Something you would like people to know about living in an “east campus small house”: It feels like a very nice apartment with a suburby, modern feel. It feels more like a place to sleep than ‘a home.’

OFF CAMPUS: Off campus housing applications are due in the Fall semester. To be eligible to apply to live off campus in the fall for the following year, students must have at least 4 semesters in campus housing (CC campus or CC affiliated off-campus program). The assumption is that an additional 2 semesters on campus will be earned during the course of the year, resulting in the student having senior standing at the start of the following fall semester. Adjuncts do not count towards your semester count.

Charlotte Schwebel

Charlotte Schwebel

Charlotte is a first-year from New York City. After getting a glimpse of the great events at Colorado College her first semester, she decided the best way to experience them was to write about them. Charlotte is fascinated by current events from campus to Congo. Her go-to's for news are the New York Times, Al Jazeera, and the Washington Post.

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *