Plans For New Ice Arena Bring Excitement to Campus

“Hockey” is a buzzword constantly associated with Colorado College for students, faculty, alumni, and even those not associated with the college. As one of CC’s two Division 1 teams, the men’s hockey team games are  a popular attraction among students. Moving from the varsity level to something more relaxed, hockey is also a popular sport on the intramural and club levels. The disconnect between the different hockey organizations, however, is palpable, as the varsity team and their spectators are required to travel 15 minutes to the Broadmoor World Arena. 

Photo by Daniel Sarche

The Broadmoor World Arena was converted from an abandoned equestrian center into an indoor ice arena and, until now, has been the home of CC hockey. The Campus Master Plan, approved a few years ago by the Board of Trustees, includes the construction of a new ice rink on the corner of Dale Street and Nevada Avenue. Ken Ralph, Director of Athletics at CC, described their mission: “The new ice arena will replace the existing facility[Honnen] but allow for the hockey team to practice on campus by building in their locker room and training facilities.”  The destruction of the existing Honnen Ice Arena will also allow for the Cossitt Amphitheater—a favorite campus location for many students—to be opened up. 

Ralph commented on the effect of the ice rink on the CC community as a whole, aside from the hockey team. “This will be a larger, cleaner, safer facility for all of our students,” said Ralph.  “We are looking at adding elements to the project we currently do not have available in Honnen—such as equipment storage for intramural hockey players or club team members.  Hockey has a role on this campus whether through varsity, club, or intramural participation and the students will enjoy the new facility.” 

The new ice rink will affect those surrounding the school as well. While some businesses, such as Wooglins and Dale Street Bistro will stay open, other town favorites like Ashley’s Attic, the secondhand boutique on Tejon, will have to relocate. “The CC community is wonderful,” said Ashley Gillit, the boutique’s owner. “They have been like family these last four years. Being in resale, there’s a special appreciation for conscious fashion, uniqueness in fashion and supporting a local businesswoman.” Having a location near a thriving community like CC has helped Gillit’s business flourish. “I’ve enjoyed helping senior students find business suits, interview attire, and a fresh new look as they venture off into the ‘real world,’” she said. 

Although she is going to miss her current location, Gillit has already secured a new spot at 723 N. Weber St., just a few minutes away from campus. “I graduated from a large university, so I can understand the need for growth and expansion for its students,” said Gillit in reference to the plans for the new rink. “It makes me sad to leave, but when one door closes another one always opens. I believe I was given a true gift to have such a prime location. CC gave me the ability to thrive as a new business owner, and for that I am grateful.” 

Ken Ralph also commented on the positive effects that he believes the construction of the rink will have on the businesses that will be staying in their present locations: they “should see a nice increase in visibility from people who use the facility. We have a lot of community programming in the ice rink and by moving the location it will cause people to take a different route to the facility which may provide additional visibility for the Tejon, Dale, Nevada businesses.” 

In his final remark on the new rink, Ralph made sure to touch on the idea of sustainability in relation to the project. “The current ice arena is an inefficient building which disproportionately adds to our carbon footprint,” he said. “The new ice rink design can dramatically reduce our energy use and our carbon footprint. With sustainability being a college-wide goal, this ice arena fits perfectly with our campus commitment to sustainable practices in building and operation.”

The project is estimated to break ground during the 2018-19 academic year and should contain about 900 seats. “There is a great deal of excitement about the project not just for the rink itself but in the other possibilities it presents—such as opening up the Cossitt space—and the progression on the campus master plans,” Ralph concluded.   

a CC degree, Hinkle believes students’ experience on the Speech team prepares them to tackle almost any industry they wish to pursue after graduation. The worlds of marketing, public affairs, international relations, and business, among others, depend on the strong communication skills the Speech team practices every day.

Speech team training remains open to any Colorado College students that are interested. Training begins during Block 1 next year.

from a large university, so I can understand the need for growth and expansion for its students,” said Gillit in reference to the plans for the new rink. “It makes me sad to leave, but when one door closes another one always opens. I believe I was given a true gift to have such a prime location. CC gave me the ability to thrive as a new business owner, and for that I am grateful.” 

Ralph also commented on the positive effects that he believes the construction of the rink will have on the businesses that will be staying in their present locations: they “should see a nice increase in visibility from people who use the facility. We have a lot of community programming in the ice rink and by moving the location it will cause people to take a different route to the facility which may provide additional visibility for the Tejon, Dale, Nevada businesses.” 

In his final remarks on the new rink, Ralph made sure to touch on the idea of sustainability in relation to the project. “The current ice arena is an inefficient building which disproportionately adds to our carbon footprint,” he said. “The new ice rink design can dramatically reduce our energy use and our carbon footprint. With sustainability being a college-wide goal, this ice arena fits perfectly with our campus commitment to sustainable practices in building and operation.”

The project is estimated to break ground during the 2018-19 academic year and should contain about 900 seats. “There is a great deal of excitement about the project, not just for the rink itself, but in the other possibilities it presents—such as opening up the Cossitt space—and the progression on the campus master plans,” Ralph concluded.

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